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Wartime Heritage                                   ASSOCIATION
Remembering WWII Nova Scotia Casualties
   Frederick Yorston Campbell
Name: Service No: Rank: Service: Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Date of Enlistment: Age at Enlistment: Place of Enlistment: Address at Enlistment: Trade: Religion: Marital Status: Next of Kin: Date of Death: Age at Death; Memorial: Additional Information:
Campbell, Frederick Yorston R/62938 Warrant Officer Class II 91 Squadron RAF, Royal Canadian Air Force August 4. 1917 Stellarton, Pictou Co., N.S. September 23, 1940 22 New Glasglow, NS Stellarton, Pictou Co., N.S. Clerk Roman Catholic Single Alexander Malcolm Campbell (Father) Stellarton, N.S. July 15, 1942 24 Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, United Kingdom Panel 102 Commemorated on Page 62 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on February 12     Frederick Campbell was the son of Alexander Malcolm and Florence Yorston Campbell, of Stellarton, Nova Scotia, Canada. Having completed his air training in Canada he proceeded overseas in August, 1941 and was assigned to 66 Spitfire RAF Squadron, Ibsley between October 7, 1941 and June 9, 1942 when he was assigned to 91 RAF Squadron at Hawkinge.   Th Squadron undertook shipping patrols and weather reconnaissance and air-sea rescue sweeps. On July 15, 1942 the Spitfire aircraft of which he was the pilot and sole occupant failed to return to base from  an operational flight.   While over the English Channel in the Hastings area, on the morning of July 14 a message was received from him that he was being attacked by a number of enemy aircraft.   Two Spitfires were flying in conjunction acting as spotters. Fellow pilots of the Squadron took off to go to their assistance but could not find any trace of  the two planes.  A search was instituted without success.  The pilot of the second Spitfire was later rescued and reported that he saw Flight Sergeant Campbell’s aircraft under attack by three enemy planes but as he was shot down into the sea he could  give nothing further concerning Frederick Campbell.  Further searches were made of the area without conclusive result.