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Wartime Heritage                                   ASSOCIATION
Remembering WWII Nova Scotia Casualties
   Harvey Kenneth Dexter
Name: Service No: Rank: Service: Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Date of Enlistment: Place of Enlistment: Address at Enlistment: Age at Enlistment:   Trade: Religion: Marital Status: Next of Kin: Date of Death: Age at Death: Cemetery: Additional Information:
Harvey Kenneth Dexter R/225047 Sergeant Royal Canadian Air Force November 20, 1921 Milton, Queens Co., NS September 16, 1940 (initial) Halifax, NS Milton, Queens Co., NS 18 Height: 5feet, 9 inches Complexion: fair Eyes: blue Hair: dark brown Student Baptist Single Warren Judson Dexter (Father) Milton, Queens Co., NS March 29, 1943 20 Milford Street Cemetery, Milton , Queens Co., NS Plot No 121   Commemorated on Page 153 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on March 31   Harbey Dexter was the son Warren Judson and Myrtle Elizabeth Dexter of Milton, Queens Co., NS. He enlisted with the 13th Company, Canadian Forestry Corps at Halifax on September 16, 1940.  He served overseas from July 2, 1941 with the CFC until a discharge from the Canadian Army on re-enlistment with the Royal Canadian Air Force in England on February 26, 1942 in London, England.  He returned to Canada on September 5, 1942. He obtained his Pilots Flying Badge on March 29, 1943.   While training at Medicine Hat, Alberta on March 30, 1943 with No 34  Service Flying Training School he was the only occupant of a Harvard Aircraft (#2881) when he took off to practice forced landing exercises. While engaged in these with other aircraft a dense fog suddenly enveloped the whole of the surrounding countryside, completely obliterating the aerodrome and any landmarks which could be used for guidance in returning to the aerodrome.  It was determined that while flying low in an endeavour to find the landing field the aircraft struck a radio mast which was situated about four miles west of No. 34 Service Flying Training School. When the fog cleaned an hour or two later the accident was discovered as the radio mast was seen to be bent at the top and the crashed aircraft was found two hundred yards from it.  The aircraft did not catch fire. Sergeant Dexter was killed instantly on impact.   His body was returned home and he was buried in the Milford Street Cemetery, Milton, Queens Co., NS.