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The 29th Canadian Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla
Neil Archie Bond Able Seaman V/71911 Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve 29th Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla MTB-461 February 14, 1945 20 Halifax Memorial Panel 13 Able Seaman Neil Archie Bond was the son of Ernest Maxwell Bond and Eliza Bond, Glace Bay, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Commemorated on Page 497 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on October 23 James Bernard Wright Able Seaman V/26288 Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve 29th Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla MTB-462 February 14, 1945 19 Halifax Memorial Panel 13 Able Seaman James Bernard Wright was the son of William Herbert Wright and Beatrice E. Wright, New Glasgow, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia. Commemorated on Page 577 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance Displayed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in Ottawa on December 2
Nova Scotia Casualties
Name: Rank: Service No: 	  Service:      Date of Death:  Age at Death: Cemetery:                  Name: Rank: Service No: 	  Service:      Date of Death:  Age at Death: Cemetery:
The 29th Canadian Motor Torpedo Boat Flotilla was anchored at Ostend, Belgium and in preparation for night patrol duty along the Belgian coast. It was afternoon, February 14, 1945, and the crew of MTB 464 was in the process of draining water from its central fuel tank and accidentally pumped 190 litres of high octane fuel into the water. A thin film slick created by the spill floated on the surface of the harbour At 4 pm the volatile fuel ignited. Canadian sailors rushed to extinguish the blaze, but the wooden MTBs quickly caught fire. Ammunition and fuel tanks exploded and, before an alarm could even be raised, a raging fire quickly spread amongst the closely-moored vessels. Fuel and ammunition supplies exploded as boat after boat caught fire. Many of the sailors were asleep on their boats and others trapped on board had no escape as even the water was aflame. By the time it was over, the 29th flotilla lost twenty-nine sailors of the Royal Canadian Navy and five of eight of its vessels were destroyed. Thirty-five British sailors and seven Royal Navy vessels were also lost. With the end of the war in sight, the RCN decided to disband the 29th MTB Flotilla on 8 March 1945.