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Remembering World War I Yarmouth Connections
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Name: Rank: Service: Date of Birth: Place of Birth Date of Death: Age at Death: Cemetery: Commemorated:
Glendall Charles Larkin Second Mate SS Aztec, American Merchant Navy May 25, 1893 Yarmouth, Nova Scotia April 1, 1917 23 Lost at Sea Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn, Mass
Glendall Crowell Larkin and Harry Lewis Larkin SS Atzec
Name: Rank: Service: Date of Birth: Place of Birth Date of Death: Age at Death: Cemetery: Commemorated:
Harry Lewis Larkin Second Assistant Engineer SS Aztec, American Merchant Navy January 26 1889 Yarmouth, Nova Scotia April 1, 1917 28 Lost at Sea Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn, Mass
Glendal Crowell Larkin and Harry Lewis Larkin were the sons of Captain Anthony Coleman Larkin (1855–1913) and Miriam Hopkins Smith Larkin (1862–1913). Their father was born in Pubnico, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia; their mother was born in Sable Island in Shelburne Co., NS. Their parents married in Milton in Yarmouth on November 23, 1886. Glendal and Harry had three sisters, Beatrice Winifred Larkin (1887–1969), Charlotte Isabell Larkin (1894–1975), and Eugenia Mabel Larkin (1897–1977); and two other brothers Kenneth Archer Larkin (1891–1958) and Herbert Mitchell Larkin (1901–1973). The two brothers were naturalized American citizens in 1917. Glendall was preparing for his second voyage with the SS Aztec and visited with relatives two weeks prior to sailing when his Aunt, Mrs. Porter pleaded with him not to go on the SS Aztec. Harry was in New York enrolled on another vessel. When Glendall met his brother in New York, he persuaded Harry to join him and make the voyage on SS Aztec. The SS Aztec, a slow moving freighter, departed New York on March 18 en route to Havre, France. The ship carried a cargo of foodstuffs and general supplies. Nine miles, west-south-west of Ushant Light on the French island of Ushant (Île d'Ouessant) that marks the southern limit of the Celtic Sea and the southern entrance to the English Channel, the Captain of the SS Aztec was on the bridge and saw a large flash on the port side forward of the bridge. Simultaneously he hear a loud explosion and the ship seemed to be lifted to one side. No submarine nor torpedo was seen. The ship began to sink forward, listing to starboard and continued to sink rapidly. The ship now in complete darkness and completely under forward, the Captain gave orders to stand by the boats to abandon the ship. The moon was shining, but the sky was overcast with frequent hail and rain squalls. The sea was very rough. At 9:40 am three boats were launched. The first and third boat were successful in clearing the ship; however, the second was broken up getting away. Number three boat was lost sight of after fifteen minutes and there was no trace of number two boat. Number one boat contained the Captain and nineteen men the only survivors. The SS Aztec was visible for about twenty minutes and then disappeared in a rain squall. After three hours the survivors were picked up by a French patrol boat which after unsuccessful searching for the other two boats, proceeded to Brest. Among the missing were both Glendal and Harry Larkin.
The San Francisco Examiner Tuesday, April 3, 1917  (pp. 1 and 3)
The Boston Globe April 3, 1917 (p.3)